Another Favorite

As I make more prints, I seem to be making more favorites (although there are still a number of ‘OK’ ones also). You try to plan for certain results but you still never really know until the piece is unwrapped.

This scarf was in the same dye bath with my first paper prints. All the tannin (tallow leaves) and iron (pine needles), with a touch of vinegar and onion skins, does create some very dynamic prints. This scarf also had included some fresh hamelia patens (hummingbird bush) leaves that were starting to turn their winter red. They created some hints of green.

Did print a few more papers with fresh botanicals. They turned out very delicate and subtle. Too difficult to get a good photo. The scarf I included in their dye bath will be ready to unwrap in a week or so. I’m trying to be patient.

Eco Prints and a Little Fall Foliage

From Surface Design

We don’t get much in the way of fall foliage in Houston but I have been picking up a few leaves and combining them with some of our evergreen botanicals. Above is a print on a cotton/silk scarf. This was exclusively a ‘fall’ print of Mexican Buckeye and Tallow leaves. I went searching for all the red Tallow leaves I could find but, interestingly, they printed yellow.

From Surface Design

This scarf is silk chiffon and was printed with Turk’s Cap and Texas Star hibiscus leaves, fern and some ‘Wandering Jew’ leaves. These botanicals were all fresh from the yard. The prints were very pale so, after the scarf had dried, I dipped it into an iron bath. I like it much better even though it lost most of the pink coloration from the ‘Wandering Jew’.

From Surface Design

This was a silk habotai scarf that has a combination of yellowing Mexican Buckeye leaves, old oak leaves and some fresh asparagus fern. The result was good. I use a bit of asparagus fern in many of my pieces as it makes a nice resist.

From Surface Design

Depending on the combinations I plan on printing in a batch, I’ll try to include a piece of cotton fabric in the mix. Having these cotton pieces provides a ‘stash’ for future embellishing projects. The piece above had a wonderful oak leaf and a bit of my yellowing Mexican Buckeye (which only acted as a resist) and a bit of ‘Wandering Jew’. The color from the ‘Wandering Jew’ is on the fabric but too lightly to be seen in the photo. This is going to be a great piece to embellish.

I have a few more pieces in the fermentation pot but it will be another week or so before I see them. Meanwhile, I’m anxious to get started on some paper printing.

Last but not Least

From CHH 2014

These are the final pieces for the CHH sale. The first scarf if one of my favorites. It is silk and has been eco printed with the autumn leaves of the Mexican Buckeye as well as some from an ornamental Pear. I added some fresh rose petals for a little more color.

From CHH 2014

This silk scarf was eco printed with rose leaves and the leaves from the “Wandering Jew” (tradescantia pendula) plant.

From CHH 2014

The final scarf was a fun indigo dye project. The beautiful cotton scarf was handwoven in Indonesia. I did a bit of folding and dipped it into an indigo pot. The color is gorgeous.

Hope to see you all the the sale. The Contemporary Handweavers of Houston Annual Sale starts this Thursday (November 20th) and runs through Saturday (November 22nd). The location is 2315 Commerce and the hours are 10am until 5pm Thursday and Friday and from 10am until 9pm on Saturday.

Intl Quilt Festival Workshop

From Surface Design

I decided this year I would only take one workshop at the Quilt Festival and did I pick the right one! It was titled Indigo Shibori Style and the instructors were Glennis Dolce (Shibori Girl) and Katrina Walker (seamstress extraordinary).

Pictured on top is the front of the vest I have not as yet completed. I still need to add the side inserts and finish the edges. The front panels of the vest are all silk. The back panels, as seen in the picture above and below, are cotton. Each of the panel sets were a different kind of silk or cotton. The panels were all prepared in Glennis’ session. The vest construction was done in Katrina’s session. I am still not overly comfortable sewing a garment but so far it is looking wearable.

From Surface Design

Workshop is highly recommended and I’ll look for these two ladies again next year. Now I can concentrate on finding supplies and looking at fantastic quilts.

Indigo Day Practice

From Surface Design

Yesterday, the local group of Surface Design Association held a trial run for an indigo dyeing day which is to be held at the Center for Contemporary Craft as their next Hands On Houston (Sep 6th). Several of us from the group did some practicing, made some samples and did some personal dyeing. After I made a couple of samples, I dyed a couple of scarves for myself. Now I have some wonderful blue pieces in my wardrobe. I do love playing with indigo. Just not brave enough to set up my own pot yet.