Simmer vs Steam

This print done primarily with pecan leaves, some sumac and annatto seeds was covered with an iron blanket and processed in a simmering bath.

This print done with oak leaves, pine needles and onion skins was covered with an iron blanket and processed over steam.

Both pieces were processed for the same amount of time and show, virtually, no real difference in appearance. I had also done an experiment using the same young fresh leaves and some hibiscus tea on two different scarves. One was simmered and the other steamed for the same length of time. I found no color difference between the two.

I see samples done by others who note they have steamed their pieces and there is definitely leaf coloration in their prints that I am not seeing in mine. All of my test pieces are silk habotai and have been processed in alum in the same way. I’ll continue doing this experiment with different leaves at different stages to see if that is the determining factor.


At Last!

It’s been way too long since my last post but I do have a couple of interesting botanical prints to write about.

One of the more difficult fabrics to offer up interesting prints is chiffon. The fabric is such an open weave that the most one can hope for is some interesting (and it usually happens) color. This time, however, a small piece of silk chiffon fooled me.

The hamelia leaves as well as the sweet gum did themselves proud. The annatto seeds provided a bit of color. The very vague and disappointing print is a grapefruit leaf. Otherwise, very nice result.

The other piece is one that I had promised to publish a couple of weeks ago. It is the scarf that was covered by the iron blanket I wrote about. It is a beauty. Don’t know that I can part with this one. The oak leaves and the onion skins are a perfect complement to the red of the madder root.

Humble Beginnings

Sometimes those things relegated to secondary roles become amazing and first rate themselves. Above is a small piece of old cotton (was a sheet once) that was used several times as a wrap over scarves when I didn’t want the wrapping string marks to show on the finished piece. Under the final prints and dye bath color can be seen shadowy shapes and colors from previous uses. This piece will now be set aside to be used as a backdrop for some stitching. It will grow up to be greater than it was.

This piece was an ‘iron blanket’. In my workshop it is a piece of cotton (a piece of old sheet) dipped in a diluted iron solution then placed over the top of a scarf before it was rolled up for the dye bath. This piece has even more interesting color and shadow prints than the wrap above as this was placed directly over the leaves on the scarf before it was rolled up. The last time it was used there were some beautiful oak leaves and a dye bath rich with madder extract. This beauty is destined to be a wall hanging.

‘Felt the Need’

Even though it’s a crazy time of year, I felt the need to do some printing. Above I used some eucalyptus, hamelia (hummingbird bush)leaves, and a bit of sweet gum.

Here I used sweet gum, maple, rose leaves, a couple of sprinkles of tumeric, oak and sumac berries. There was so much tannin the overall look is brown.

My favorite is this one. The scarf is covered with rose leaves, hamelia leaves large and small, some sweet gum and madder root.

I’m very happy I ‘felt the need’ to do these as the supply I had at 18 Hands Gallery was almost depleted. I took these and a couple more I had forgotten before down there today. I am very thrilled there are so many people interested in (and buying) my work. Next year I’ll try doing fewer scarves and do more table runners, pillow covers, etc. And of course, I’ll be doing a lot more indigo shibori.

It’s been a good year. I’m looking forward to even bigger and better things next year.

More Fun at 18 Hands

This Saturday, December 12th, the “Normally in January but
why not in December” Earring Slam Jam is being held at 18 Hands Gallery. The show is from 11 am – 5 pm. 18 Hands is located at 249 W. 19th St in the Heights. Phone Number is 713-869-3099. There will be champagne and chocolate fondue.

Below are some of the earrings I’ll have there and there are also some of my eco print scarves available in the gallery.

A sampling of my scarves.

Always Time

The past month has been very busy. There was the Handweaver’s Sale, The international Quilt Festival, getting the Guild House Gallery back up and now my Trunk Show. But in spite of it all, there was still some time to be found doing a bit of eco printing.

I’m not overly fond of satin silk but when it’s printed there is a shimmering depth to the prints that can’t be ignored.

A more difficult fabric is silk chiffon. Due to the sheerness of the fabric, it is difficult to see much of a print. This one, however, surprised me.

The first 2 prints were processed together in a madder root bath and had a bit of tumeric sprinkled on them.

This was done with a combination of dry and fresh leaves. The print turned out more faintly than I had hoped but a quick dip in iron water gave it new life.

Another combination dry and fresh print. This one turned out more to my liking especially with the wonderful purple prints of the dried Texas Star hibiscus flower.

Another combination print. With the eucalyptus and tea sprinkles it looks completely different than the rest.

The last 3 prints were processed together and are silk habotai.